Shagwüf

Shagwüf

Handgrenades, Kenneka Cook

Sun, May 6, 2018

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

The Camel

$5 ADV, $8 DOS

Tickets at the Door

Shagwüf
Shagwüf
"Shagwüf isn't reinventing the wheel, just putting a cool spin on a tried and true concept.. Stylistically they are reminiscent of LA's 'X', with a little nod to 'the Pixies' while leaning a little more towards the punk end of the hard rock spectrum with just the right amount of hard blues and psychedelia to invoke early metal pioneers like 'Black Sabbath', all wrapped up in a slightly twangy, swampy package that is sure to keep your head banging. Sally Rose steps out of her role as Charlottesville's Folk Rock Princess and straps on a bass to lend the driving low end of the band, along with her sultry vocals and song writing prowess. Sweet Pete Stallings (Lost Indian, Sally Rose Band, Secret Ninja) lends his quirky songwriting chops along with his signature riffy guitar style. The two of them provide the vocals for the band, and anyone who has seen the Sally Rose Band knows these two sing well together. Drummer Pablo Oliveri (Pablo & the Dregs, The Murder Bros, Book of Kills, The Findells) attacks the drums like a man on a mission while still finding time to be one of the most tasteful players in the area. Pablo is always a solid part of whatever band he is in, and he is the perfect drummer for this project. The band has found early success due to their solid musicianship, musical reputation. Their debut EP 'Heavy Petting' is infectious. Although it's hard to pick from an EP full of great tunes, highlights include 'Swamp D' and the slinky rocker 'Cassolette'. This band isn't reinventing rock, just keeping it cool!"

Bill Howard (The Judy Chops)
Handgrenades
Handgrenades
"It’s no easy task for a band to progress their sound while retaining the distinctive elements honed in their early years. But Detroit’s the HandGrenades have pulled off this feat with aplomb, undergoing an evolution in both their physical makeup and sonic composition since forming in 2008. With 2011’s debut EP Three Cheers For the Wonder Years, the group established their trademark Beatlesesque melodies and three-part vocal harmonies, served with some garage rock edge and a bit of Motown flavor thrown in for good measure. The paradigm continued in a more refined manner with 2012’s full-length The Morning After, singer-songwriters Nick Chevillet and Andrew Pawelski (also on guitar and bass, respectively) alternating and merging vocals, Tom Pawelski on second guitar and vocals, and Joby Kaslowski manning the drum kit. Two years on, Jesse Shepherd-Bates stepped in when Tom moved on and Joel Sanders joined to add keys to the mix. With 2014’s Zach Shipps-produced 52 EP, the newly configured quintet’s guitar-driven structures surge with galvanizing immediacy while displaying some more some ethereal, experimental tones. Their latest video — for 52’s closing track, “Wrapped in Plastic” —premiered on PopMatters and the group is eying a sophomore LP on the horizon. In the meantime, catch them live to be privy to one of the mitten state’s most energetic group of ruffians." - Cole Waterman
Kenneka Cook
Kenneka Cook
Kenneka Cook has always loved outer space.

Growing up in Richmond, VA, she was obsessed with the moon, staring out her window at the night sky in awe of its mystery. The title track on Cook’s debut record Moonchild, set for a February 23rd release on American Paradox, is both a product of her intense connection with the cosmos, as well as a tribute to the embracing of celestial feminine energy. Musically, Cook bridges the gap between beat-driven sonics and melodic jazz in a brazenly colorful and tonally rich debut album.

Cook’s early training took place in her church choir and school chorus. Her tastes eventually shifted towards heavyweights like Billie Holiday, Erykah Badu, and The Cardigans, informing her confidently playful, harmony-heavy, atmospheric style. Initially she was making acapella songs with a microphone and laptop during the end of her college career out of necessity, describing her voice as “the only instrument I truly had access to” at the time.

She discovered the process of live looping through Reggie Watts, who sometimes uses looping techniques in the songs found in his comedy acts. She covered the jazz standard “Night and Day” using the technique and it turned out better than she ever could have hoped. From there, she began to fully explore creating music and on the new album, she welcomes a variety of live players into the fold to flush out and widen the unique sound she created on her own.

Moonchild is a glimpse through Cook’s lens, exhibiting heartfelt lyrics and melodic themes on spirituality, technology, and social interaction. The album opens with serious meditations on the state of human connection (“My Universe”, “Don’t Ask Me”) and finds its way to a fun-as-hell-take on the now-classic “The Kids Don’t Stand a Chance” by Vampire Weekend. “Please” transforms a conversation between Cook and her mother into a soft hymn, and “Brings Me Back (111)” depicts the mutual beckoning of soulmates.

There’s a DIY backbone here too, as the album was recorded entirely in producer Scott Lane's living room, transformed into a makeshift studio that was regularly set up and torn down. It was recorded this past summer over 3 months time, and features players Devonne Harris (piano/Butcher Brown), Kelli Strawbridge (drums/Kings), Caleb Knight (drums/Sammi Lanzetta), Chris Speasmaker (piano/The Congress), Andrew Sisk (drums/Angelica Garcia), Marcus Tenney (trumpet/Foxygen), Russell Lacy (guitar/Mikrowaves), Sid Kingsley (saxophone/Sid Kingsley), Jared Pool (mandolin/Larry Keel), and Scott Lane (production/engineering).
Venue Information:
The Camel
1621 W. Broad Street
Richmond, VA, 23220
http://www.thecamel.org